Creating Our Legacy


“The Madison and Minnelusa aquifers are two of the most important aquifers in the Black Hills.” – United States Geological Survey …. read more.


Save the Dates/Actions needed.

Photo taken- May 7, 2017 during the last EPA UIC Permit hearing held in Rapid City.

YOU STILL HAVE TIME TO SUBMIT YOUR PUBLIC COMMENT!

This deadline has now been extended to Wednesday, Dec. 11, 2019 at 11:59 PM Eastern Time or 9:59 PM Mountain Time. The sooner the better.

This is the Public Comments regarding the proposed Dewey-Burdock ISL Uranium Mining Project for it’s underground injection wells or UIC Area Permits, with three additional items added; 1) the identification of traditional cultural properties. 2) options for approval of the aquifer exemption, and 3) a revised draft environmental justice analysis

You can also mail you comment to:

Valois Robinson
U.S. EPA Region 8
MailCode: 8WD-SDU
1595 Wynkoop Street
Denver, CO 80202-1129



Wyoming approves acid leach uranium mining – first one in the U.S.

Courtesy of Marty Two Bulls Sr., Oglala Lakota, http://www.m2bulls.com

The State of Wyoming recently allowed the Strata uranium mine in the far northeastern part of the state to move forward using acid leaching. This is the first commercial use of acid leach for uranium mining in the United States. For more on the problems associated with acid uranium leaching, see the past announcement for the Jan. 2019 public comment period.

The Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality (WDEQ) formally approved an amendment to the Lance source materials license on 31 July, notifying Peninsula Energy Ltd subisidiary Strata Energy Inc the following day. The authorization confirms that low pH in-situ leach (ISL) methodology complies with the regulatory standards and requirements under the state regulator’s purview. [source: http://world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/Wyoming-approves-first-use-of-low-pH-ISL-uranium-p]


PUBLIC’S RIGHT TO KNOW.

ORGANIZATION SEEKS GOLD EXPLORATION INFORMATION:

APPEAL OF FOREST SERVICE DECISION FILED … More info here


Recent interview on South Dakota Public Broadcasting: “Water in the Black Hills: What do we need to know – and do—to care for our water resources now and into the future?

04/30/2019 | 55m 19s “Water in the Black Hills: What do we need to know – and do—to care for our water resources now and into the future? We will review the hydrology of the Black Hills, examine natural and human stressors on water resources, identify agencies and organizations working on the issue, and explore the importance of our involvement to ensure quality water resources for the future.


Urgent: Another gold exploration company has come to the Black Hills.


PACTOLA RESERVOIR NEEDS OUR PROTECTION
This is our WATER!

THE THREAT: It is named F3 GOLD EXPLORATION, working with Big Rock Exploration, and it is from Minnesota. … Read more


Our Alliance is a diverse collection of citizens concerned about the health, environmental, and economic impacts that irresponsible mining projects would have on our communities, people, economy, and natural resources.

Join us and let’s Keep Black Hills Water Alive!

Join our mailing list for updates or to volunteer, or donate. This is our Water!


REVIEW OF LITERATURE ON CONNECTIONS BETWEEN RAPID CREEK AND OTHER WATER SOURCES: IMPLICATIONS FOR GOLD MINING-RELATED ACTIVITY IN THE RAPID CREEK WATERSHED

“Complex interactions between Rapid Creek and ground water occur between Pactola Reservoir and central Rapid City. Streamflow losses west of Rapid City recharge aquifers in the Madison Limestone and Minnelusa Formation, and artesian springflow from these aquifers occurs in several locations in Rapid City.”[1]  Download Research Paper to Learn more


What Legacy are you creating?


SPECIAL REPORT:

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Rivers at Risk: S.D. waterways serve as dumping grounds for human, industrial, ag wastes

This is the first in a series of stories by South Dakota News Watch on the status of South Dakota’s rivers.  Find additional stories, graphics, photographs and videos, at sdnewswatch.org… read more


NATIONAL:


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A struggle over a proposed uranium mine in the Black Hills of South Dakota — far from population centers — illuminates important aspects of water issues, Native American rights, deep disposal wells, the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) role, and the legal issues swirling around them all. Uranium mining is an issue of national importance, because it is the first step in the nuclear chain. Without uranium mining, there could be no nuclear power or nuclear weapons. But the issues start with water. … Read more

Download here to print (front/back) or Contact us to order a pre-printed brochure.


The Infamous 1872 Mining Law: Reform Bill Introduced

New efforts to reform the 1872 Mining Law, which is the law that permits companies to mine on federal public lands without paying any royalties. There’s more information on the and on the reform effort here — Mining Reform Bill Introduced on Anniversary of Infamous 1872 Law.

Grijalva-Lowenthal proposal would bring U.S. mining law into the 21st Century. …Read more


LOCAL:


COURT OF APPEALS RULES FAVORABLY IN URANIUM CASE

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia issued a decision on Friday, July 20, in the case Oglala Sioux Tribe v. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The Court’s decision supports the Tribe’s arguments and is an important step in protecting the Black Hills from uranium mining. Read More.


STOP GOLD MINING EXPLORATION: PESLA UNDER ATTACK

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PDF: Save Rochford

“Save Rochford and Rapid Creek” Group seeks to protect a precious Black Hills water source from gold exploration drilling and future gold mining. The central Black Hills group is opposing a gold exploration operation that would be at the headwaters of Rapid Creek and near an important Lakota Sacred site known as PeSla.  The group has started a GoFundMe account that will help pay for outreach materials such as flyers, artwork, and mailings.  Your donation will help defend against this outrage to the environment, forestall the company receiving additional permits to explore, make a template for future resistance, or even force the Forest Service to do an Environmental Impact Statement, which it has so far chosen not to do.  Wopila! [thanks given to all existence and the blessing inherent in each moment of it] Look for us on FB, @saverochford


Toxic Uranium Mining was stopped once before in the Black Hills.  We can do it again. Click on this 1980s bumper sticker to learn more.

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